Sunday, July 2, 2017

'Rogue One' and '10 Cloverfield Lane' tie with three 2017 Saturn Awards for film


I expected one of the big winners at last Wednesday's 43rd Saturn Awards but was almost completely surprised by the other.  I thought 'Rogue One' would be a big winner at the Saturn Awards. I forecast it taking home the awards for Best Science Fiction Film and Best Film Direction, even though I voted for "Arrival" in these categories, and voted for it for Best Film Music, even though I acknowledged that it was competing against "La La Land," the Oscar winner, which I thought would win if given half a chance by the electorate.  It won both of the categories I predicted it would, plus Best Film Visual/Special Effects, which I didn't even consider it winning, although I should have, as I voted for "Doctor Strange" instead.  That made three awards out of eleven nominations for the big movie winner I saw coming.

The one that surprised me was "10 Cloverfield Lane."  While I recognized that it was the best of three non-supernatural horror films, the others being "The Shallows" and "Split," nominated for Best Thriller Film, I voted for "The Girl on the Train" instead.  I didn't consider that "non-supernatural horror film" would be the preferred version of thriller for the Saturn Awards electorate, so I was somewhat surprised that it won.  I was completely surprised by Mary Elizabeth Winstead's win for Best Actress in a Film.  I was so firm in my opinion that Amy Adams or Emily Blunt deserved the award but that Felicity Jones might steal it that I didn't even consider Winstead would win.  I should have.  As I wrote about last years winners at the 2016 Saturn Awards, "the Saturn voters are not about subtle."  Adams and Blunt were subtle; Winstead was not.  I did vote for one winner, John Goodman for Best Supporting Actor in a Film, so I expected his one, but that was only one out of three.

While the films tied, "Star Wars" was the winning franchise, as "Star Wars Rebels" won Best Animated Series or Film on TelevisionI voted for the show and I feel good about doing so, as the "Star Wars" franchise earned four awards, more than any other series or property this year.  To celebrate, I'm sharing Red Carpet Report on Mingle Media's interview of the Cast of Star Wars Rebels.


Follow over the jump for the rest of the film winners plus two more videos, one each for "Star Wars" and "10 Cloverfield Lane."

Since "Rogue One" only won three awards, five less than last year's "The Force Awakens," there were more trophies to go around.  Consequently, several movies won two awards.  The one that surprised me was "Doctor Strange," which won Best Comic-to-Film Motion Picture and Best Supporting Actress in a Film for Tilda Swinton.  I voted for "Deadpool," which I thought was a lock, and Margot Robbie, which I wasn't so sure about, as the nominees were very strong and I wrote that I'd be happy with any of them.  Still, "Doctor Strange" was my second-favorite superhero film of last year and Tilda Swinton is an outstanding actress.  As for "Deadpool," at least Ryan Reynolds won Best Actor in a Film.  He deserved it.

"La La Land" came as less of a surprise.  I voted for it as Best Independent Film, which it won, and thought it could win Best Film Music, which it did, even though I voted for "Rogue One" instead.

A film I did not vote for at all also won two awards.  "The BFG" won Best Film Editing, which I thought "Arrival" deserved, and Best Film Production Design, a category I gave to "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them."  The Harry Potter prequel at least managed to repeat its Oscar win for Best Film Costumes, helped along in small part by my vote.

The rest of the films won one award each.  "The Jungle Book" won Best Fantasy Film, beating my choice, "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them."  While not my first or second choice, I'm O.K. with the winner, as it won the Oscar for Special Effects.  I was leaning to "Don't Breathe" for Best Horror Film before switching to "Train to Busan."  My initial choice, based on its Golden Trailer winning TV spot, ended up being the winner.  I suspect the advertising swayed others, too.  I voted for "Hidden Figures" as Best Action/Adventure Film and it won.  I voted for "Under the Shadow," and thought "Shin Godzilla" would win, so I was surprised but not disappointed that "The Handmaiden" won instead.  I expected "Finding Dory" would win Best Animated Film, even though I voted for "Zootopia," so I was neither surprised nor disappointed.

Several other films won a sole acting or technical award.  I voted for Tom Holland for Best Performance by a Younger Actor in a Film and he won for his performance in "Captain America: Civil War."  I also voted for Eric Heisserer to win Best Film Screenplay for "Arrival," and he won, too.  He can put the trophy on the shelf next to his Nebula Award.  Finally, I went back and forth between "Star Trek Beyond" and "Suicide Squad" for Best Film Make-Up.  My first choice was "Star Trek Beyond" but ended up voting for "Suicide Squad" because who was I to argue with the professionals?  However, the Saturn electorate loves to tell off the experts, so they voted for "Star Trek Beyond."  I shouldn't be surprised.

I plan on continuing with the television winners tomorrow.  In the meantime, enjoy two more red carpet interviews by Mingle Media of people involved with the top movie winners.  First, Dan Trachtenberg #10CloverfieldLane interviewed at the 43rd Annual Saturn Awards.


Next, representing the new extended Star Wars Universe, Janina Gavankar #StarWarsBattefrontII interviewed at the 43rd Annual Saturn Awards #SaturnAwards.


As I wrote in May, I was afraid that "Sleepy Hollow" would be cancelled.  It was.  I'm glad Gavankar has landed on her feet with this gig in the Star Wars Extended Universe.  May my readers and I see her in more Star Wars properties.

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